Childminding Best Practice

Home » Characteristics of Effective Learning (COEL) » What does ‘Cultural Capital’ mean childminders should DO?

What does ‘Cultural Capital’ mean childminders should DO?

Welcome to my blog

Follow to receive articles by email on all aspects of childminding best practice and stay up to date with important changes in legislation affecting childminders.

The first and most important thing to say about “Cultural Capital” – the new Ofsted buzz word that has appeared in the September 2019 Inspection Handbook –  is DON’T PANIC.

  • You do not need to attend a training course on cultural capital.
  • Ofsted does not want to see a poster up in your setting labelled cultural capital.
  • You do not have to start taking childminded children to the opera.

Most of you will find that the only change you need to make to what you are already doing is to learn the new buzz word so that if you hear it during your inspection you keep calm and carry on!

Cultural capital is defined in the new framework as ‘the essential knowledge that children need to be educated citizens’ and what is necessary to ‘prepare them for future success’.

Some children arrive at your setting with different experiences than others. The experiences they arrive with are their ‘cultural capital’. All children have SOME cultural capital when they arrive with you at your setting. But for some, this cultural capital is not enough to narrow the gap and get them ready for school. The curriculum you plan for that unique child can make all the difference to his or her future.

Your job as a childminder is to find ways to establish what a child’s ‘weaknesses’ are, and then plan your curriculum to help the child in the area that he is missing or behind.

A key example is talking. Some children arrive at your setting speaking really well with great vocabularies because they are exposed to lots of words and their parents read loads of books to them at home. Research has shown time and again that this gives them a massive advantage in school and in life. Other children come from much less fortunate backgrounds where they are not read to so much at home and know far fewer words. If you identify talking and vocabulary for example, as a child’s weakness, then your job as his childminder is to find ways to enhance it. In other words, you should make sure to plan a curriculum where you read a lot more and talk a lot more to children whose parents do not read to them at home.

The same rule applies right across the areas of learning and development and would also apply to the characteristics of effective learning.

Another example Ofsted gave during its webinar was a child who knows everything about dinosaurs, but nothing about plants. In this case, you could enhance his learning by teaching him about plants.

A characteristic of effective learning example might be a child who is never given any choices at home and who appears to passively take everything he is given. You can enhance his learning and prepare him for school by encouraging him to make choices while he is with you.

None of this is anything you are probably not already doing! 

It just has a new name and is now in the Inspection Handbook to draw your attention to the sheer importance of doing the utterly obvious!

Here is what you need to do to ‘do’ cultural capital:

  • Do starting points observations on all new children across all the learning and development areas and the COEL. This will show you the child’s strengths and areas of weaknesses.
  • Ask yourself what you would do to improve the child’s area of weakness.
  • Make a plan for each individual child. What can you develop? What can you encourage?
  • Follow through on your plans.
  • After you’ve been doing your plans for a while, check that your plans are having an effect. Has the child started to catch up? Have you broadened his cultural capital from when he started with you?

All children arrive in your setting with a different background and different skills.

Ofsted’s new buzz word is just another way of asking childminders to help to reduce disadvantage when you see it.

Remember that what you do for that child can potentially make all the difference.

 

Childminding Best Practice Newsletter

Sign up for the free quarterly Childminding Best Practice Newsletter using the orange sign up box on my website and I will send you best practice ideas, childminding news, EYFS tips, outstanding ideas, stories from other childminders, arts and crafts project templates, new products, and links.

http://www.kidstogo.co.uk/childminders/childminding.html

 

About Kay Woods and Kids To Go

Kay Woods Kids To GoKay Woods has been writing and selling childminding resources through her company Kids To Go since 2008. Her products include the Ultimate Childminding Checklist, the Learning Journey Plus for planning, observation and assessment and best practice resources promoting diversity, safety and childminding in the great outdoors (Forest Childcare). She is the author of the Start Learning book set published by Tarquin and she writes the free quarterly Childminding Best Practice Newsletter.

Lots of places offer help to childminders. I provide solutions.

http://www.kidstogo.co.uk/childminders/childminding.html


4 Comments

  1. […] you give to children especially the most disadvantaged is very important. I have written more about what cultural capital means to childminders in this […]

    Like

  2. alison maxfield says:

    thankyou x

    Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Pamela Summerfield says:

    Hi Kay is the actual new framework ready to download yet. Is there a link I could go on? Thank you Pam 😊

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 3,358 other followers

Tags

Active learning British values characteristics of effective learning childminder food business legislation childminder food safety childminder fridge thermometers childminders with high expectations childminders working with parents childminding British values childminding business advice childminding closing gaps childminding contract childminding directories childminding food receipts childminding humour childminding inspection childminding marketing childminding outdoor spaces Childminding outings childminding paperwork childminding pay childminding planning childminding posters childminding risk assessment childminding safety childminding self care childminding stranger danger COEL Communication with parents continual professional development for childminders cpd for childminders creating and thinking critically Development Matters display ideas for childminders diversity awareness for childminders diversity planning for childminders Evaluation schedule for inspections of registered early years provision filling childminding vacancies food allergens childminders Forest Childcare inspection tips Learning Journeys long term planning marketing for childminders never go anywhere with a stranger never take gifts from strangers new to childminding next steps ofsted inspection Ofsted inspections British Values Outdoor childminding Parents Poster partnership working planning planning checklist poisonous garden plants poisonous plants on outings posters for childminding settings pre-school stranger danger Quitting childminding risk assessment for chidminding outings risk assessment for childminding garden safer buildings safer food better business for childminders safer strangers Self-evaluation form tips short term planning Statutory framework for the EYFS stranger danger supporting learning at home teaching stranger danger to pre-school children using themes what is a stranger What to do if you are worried that a child is being abused: Summary working in partnership with parents
%d bloggers like this: